Female + Autistic = Ignored

Thinking back on all of the clients that I have had, few of them have been both female and autistic. While I have seen numerous mothers who (to me) clearly had the textbook signs of autism, they never had a diagnosis and often presented as more worn and drained than their counterparts.

This is a very real issue in the autism world. I’ve said this before, but looking back at my traits as a preschooler, I had some signs myself. They were never addressed or even brought up aside from one random report. I couldn’t sit still during circle time, had a strange fascination with beating/cleaning the erasers, and played alongside kids rather than with them. I was humorously labeled a “non-conformist,” and that was that.

I’m not saying I’m on the spectrum, but really, how would I know? It’s never been given as a possibility, often because I was too well-behaved (read: quiet), did excellent in school, had friends, etc. The truth of the matter is that the medical and mental health communities do not look for autism in girls/women like they do with boys/men, and this needs to change.

The articles below do a nice job of discussing this further, if you wish to do some more reading into it:

Girls with autism getting a rough deal

Diagnosed at 45 with autism

 

Being Led

I’m sad that I can’t watch this entire documentary (it’s for UK audiences only), but those in the UK can watch it for I believe another two days on BBC One. People are saying good things about it. This segment is a very refreshing look at the father/son dynamic with regards to autism. It is on BBC Stories’ Facebook page.

 

Also, programming note: There’s a lot going on in my world for the next month or so. While I’m determined to commit to keeping up with about a post a week, I may miss one here or there. Once things get settled in June, expect an uptick in activity.