A biomarker test for autism?

I really love the work that the UC Davis MIND Institute is doing with regards to conditions such as autism and ADHD. This newest bit of news could help identify a certain subset of autism much faster. According to the article, it would probably only identify about 17% of children on the spectrum for now. This could, however, lead to specialized diagnostic tools and interventions that could benefit everyone further down the line.

Here’s a link to the article, and definitely check out the rest of their site. The MIND Institute is always looking for research participants, and has regularly updated information on their findings.

New Biomarker Panel Could Accelerate Autism Diagnoses 

Painting, Self-Identity, and Deviation

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Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

On Saturday, I had a chance to do a “paint and sip” afternoon. I wasn’t even going to go at first, but was talked into it by a childhood friend of mine. The experience gave me an interesting look at creativity, our self-identity, and how willing we are to deviate from societal norms.

For these events, we are usually given a beginning sketch, and then are walked through how to essentially duplicate the picture. It’s a genius idea, because the steps are explained in such a way where you would have to really try to mess it up. It’s nearly fool proof. This picture, titled “Golden Goddess,” featured a black woman’s facial outline and shoulder. Everything else would have to be painted in.

I started deviating a bit from the start. I mixed the colors for the skin tone a bit differently, and I decided that I wasn’t going to give her a curly afro like the example because I wanted her to look more like me. I also wasn’t going to be too crazy with her makeup because, again, that wasn’t me. I found myself wishing that I had blue instead of green paint so that I could make purple and really let loose on the color scheme.

Strangely enough, it never crossed my mind to ask for blue paint.

I knew what elements I wanted to add to the painting, but I didn’t because I didn’t feel that I had the resources or access to them…even though there was plenty of blue paint on one of the counters at the front of the room. I didn’t think to ask and instead just sat, wishing.

While in the midst of this mini-crisis, I starting looking at the others’ paintings. Most were following the instructions to the letter. Then I saw one woman who had clearly decided to go a different route. Her finished goddess ended up with pinkish-red bushy hair, a green top instead of a red one, and roses around her instead of circles. It looked awesome.

My finished goddess looked like a halfway point between the example and whatever I wanted. I love her, but I know that she can be more.

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I then started looking at more pictures from the business of other painting parties. I was genuinely curious at how few people tried to deviate from the presenting pictures. There were several where I thought, “Oh, I would’ve added these colors, maybe changed that background into this.” When it came to the painting of a black woman, though, I saw the highest number of deviations to have the subject look more like the painter. So why didn’t I see such deviation with the landscape or object painting classes?

No, I’m not answering or looking to answer that question. This is more simply food for thought. How willing are you to paint outside the lines? Do you prefer to follow the norms, or pivot a little? How much do you pivot? How does art help one deviate a bit more than usual? If you know what you want to create, how willing are you to pursue it?

Monday motivation, indeed.

UC Davis MIND autism study

UC Davis’ MIND Institute is launching a study about anxiety and autism for children ages 8-12 years old. They are looking to see what types of treatments are best for these individuals. The focus seems to be on CBT (Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy) versus medications. Participants get free treatment and apparently $100 for each assessment performed. This is mainly for those in the northern California area.

Here is the link to the video discussing the launch of the study:

 

Here is a link to more info about the study on the MIND Institute’s site: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/centers/ace/ace-staar.html

You can also check the “Research” tab on the study’s page to see all of the studies they are currently running. I have heard several people from the MIND Institute speak at various events, and I love the work that they do.

Tuesday Thoughts

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I think Tuesday posts are going to be the days where all of my not-quite-realized post ideas are going to go. So, without further adieu…

  • Reading the thoughts of a young adult on the spectrum (via Facebook) has been one of the biggest eye openers for me, because he brings up situations and viewpoints that I never conceived of.
  • The autism world with regards to therapeutic approaches is becoming increasingly marginalized. It’s like being in a circle surrounded by base camps…and you are either not invited to them, or you don’t quite agree with them. Interesting position to be in…and a great launching space to create your own base camp.
  • A parent told me that she was confused when someone asked her what her son’s “special gift” was. She shrugged and replied, “I told her that I didn’t know what it was or what she meant.” I glanced at him, looked back at her, and thought, “Spatial intelligence.” I don’t really see them as gifts, though.
  • I follow several families on the @sparcguidance on Instagram. They are all composed of pure awesome, and I love that they are sharing their journeys. It’s not easy and not for everyone, but I appreciate it.
  • A 2-minute questionnaire has been developed by researchers at Rutgers University that could identify autism in children much younger than the average age of around 5 years old. You can read more about the questionnaire here and here. This is fascinating, especially since it appeared accurate across different socioeconomic groups. I think that has a lot to do with the fact that the questions are in layman’s terms, as opposed to overly academic or analytic jargon.
  • Finally, a multiple intelligence note: As I’ve mentioned in my post on spatial intelligence, I’ve noticed that quite a few of my clients have been above average or exceptional in this category, regardless of sex, race, etc. It is not the easiest intelligence to spot, though. So here is a tip for parents: Someone with high spatial intelligence is often good at building, but they may be also really good at directions and orientating themselves to areas. They are really good at games that focus on spatial strategy (like Blockus or Tetris-like games), and can probably help with putting things together, be it a Lego set or that new chair for the living room. The key to remember in any of the intelligences, though, is that the person enjoys it. If they love it and are good at it, you have potentially found their purpose.

Programing Note: We’re on the lookout for guest bloggers, so please drop us a line at sparcguidance@gmail.com if you want to write something about autism, multiple intelligence, life purpose, etc.  We’re also working on our first workshop on multiple intelligence and uncovering them! We will give more information once everything is finalized, but we are definitely excited about it!

Have a great week!

Psychology Today: “Change Artists”

Count on one of the parents of a client to spot this before I did. 🙂

I am proud to be featured in Psychology Today’s cover story, “Change Artists,” for their February 2018 issue. I did my interview (through email and phone) months ago, and had almost forgotten about it. I had no idea that it was going to be a cover story, though!

The article speaks to several people about how they were able to change their lives or their overall view of life. My part involved me talking about some of my insecurities, which is something I rarely talk about outside of friends, and how I overcame them. I am about halfway, and again near the end, as Angel Wilson.

Overall, it’s a really good article and while long, is worth the read. I hope it inspires a lot of people! Thank you to the author Abby Ellin; you did an amazing job, even while being sick! 🙂

Psychology Today: Change Artists

The MI Series

I will be starting a series this week covering the different types of multiple intelligence. This theory is the cornerstone of my business/thesis, and I thought it would be nice to explore the components of it a bit more to give better insight into what I do.

The Multiple Intelligence theory itself was developed by Howard Gardner in 1983. In his book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences, he mapped out eight different types of intelligence that went beyond the traditional viewpoint of IQ. There are a few others that have been suggested, explored, and/or dismissed, but these are the core eight:

  • Visual/Spatial
  • Interpersonal
  • Intrapersonal
  • Musical
  • Naturalistic
  • Logical/Mathematical
  • Verbal/Linguistic
  • Bodily/Kinesthetic

I will more than likely touch on the proposed/suggested intelligence types at the end, since they are quite interesting themselves.

The first intelligence that will be covered later this week is Visual-Spatial, which I have seen often with regards to my autistic clients.

 

The Value of Connection

I saw an article today on the results of a study about music therapy and autism. The study indicated that “improvisational music therapy, compared with enhanced standard care, resulted in no significant difference in symptom severity based on the ADOS social affect domain over 5 months” (Bieleninik L. et al. JAMA 318, 525-535 (2017).

This is a bit of a letdown to many in the music therapy world, but it is also a call to action of sorts. Some of therapies outside the normal scope of the traditional autism therapies (including music and listening therapies, dance therapy, drama therapy, etc.) can take a lesson from this study.

By improving and adjusting the therapies to accommodate individual differences, focus on connection/engagement, and folding the parents/family into therapy, there may be clearer and more positive results. I have noticed this to be the case in many of the more “traditional” and clinical therapeutic approaches.

I have seen clients improve from these more art-related therapies, but a key component to client success lies not necessarily in the therapy itself (though it may certainly help, of course). The key is connection and relationship. In an article about the study on spectrumnews.org, it was noted that other studies have indicated that having a connection with the music therapist improved clients’ social skills. Working on creating a connection is, in my eyes, the most important part of any autism therapy. If you have engagement, you will naturally be able to do more with and for your client.

Below is a direct link to the article about the study. I would love to hear others’ thoughts about this. Have you tried music therapy before? Did it help? What was the experience with the music therapist like?

Music therapy for autism shows minimal social benefit