The MI Series

I will be starting a series this week covering the different types of multiple intelligence. This theory is the cornerstone of my business/thesis, and I thought it would be nice to explore the components of it a bit more to give better insight into what I do.

The Multiple Intelligence theory itself was developed by Howard Gardner in 1983. In his book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences, he mapped out eight different types of intelligence that went beyond the traditional viewpoint of IQ. There are a few others that have been suggested, explored, and/or dismissed, but these are the core eight:

  • Visual/Spatial
  • Interpersonal
  • Intrapersonal
  • Musical
  • Naturalistic
  • Logical/Mathematical
  • Verbal/Linguistic
  • Bodily/Kinesthetic

I will more than likely touch on the proposed/suggested intelligence types at the end, since they are quite interesting themselves.

The first intelligence that will be covered later this week is Visual-Spatial, which I have seen often with regards to my autistic clients.

 

The Value of Connection

I saw an article today on the results of a study about music therapy and autism. The study indicated that “improvisational music therapy, compared with enhanced standard care, resulted in no significant difference in symptom severity based on the ADOS social affect domain over 5 months” (Bieleninik L. et al. JAMA 318, 525-535 (2017).

This is a bit of a letdown to many in the music therapy world, but it is also a call to action of sorts. Some of therapies outside the normal scope of the traditional autism therapies (including music and listening therapies, dance therapy, drama therapy, etc.) can take a lesson from this study.

By improving and adjusting the therapies to accommodate individual differences, focus on connection/engagement, and folding the parents/family into therapy, there may be clearer and more positive results. I have noticed this to be the case in many of the more “traditional” and clinical therapeutic approaches.

I have seen clients improve from these more art-related therapies, but a key component to client success lies not necessarily in the therapy itself (though it may certainly help, of course). The key is connection and relationship. In an article about the study on spectrumnews.org, it was noted that other studies have indicated that having a connection with the music therapist improved clients’ social skills. Working on creating a connection is, in my eyes, the most important part of any autism therapy. If you have engagement, you will naturally be able to do more with and for your client.

Below is a direct link to the article about the study. I would love to hear others’ thoughts about this. Have you tried music therapy before? Did it help? What was the experience with the music therapist like?

Music therapy for autism shows minimal social benefit

 

Female + Autistic = Ignored

Thinking back on all of the clients that I have had, few of them have been both female and autistic. While I have seen numerous mothers who (to me) clearly had the textbook signs of autism, they never had a diagnosis and often presented as more worn and drained than their counterparts.

This is a very real issue in the autism world. I’ve said this before, but looking back at my traits as a preschooler, I had some signs myself. They were never addressed or even brought up aside from one random report. I couldn’t sit still during circle time, had a strange fascination with beating/cleaning the erasers, and played alongside kids rather than with them. I was humorously labeled a “non-conformist,” and that was that.

I’m not saying I’m on the spectrum, but really, how would I know? It’s never been given as a possibility, often because I was too well-behaved (read: quiet), did excellent in school, had friends, etc. The truth of the matter is that the medical and mental health communities do not look for autism in girls/women like they do with boys/men, and this needs to change.

The articles below do a nice job of discussing this further, if you wish to do some more reading into it:

Girls with autism getting a rough deal

Diagnosed at 45 with autism

 

LA Versus Bay: Autism

I am FINALLY in LA and settling in while scoping out the apartment scene. I have also been taking the time to look at the various agencies that focus on or at least include autism therapies in their offerings. I have already seen some interesting differences between agencies in LA county, and agencies in the Bay Area, and I’m sure more will pop up (which I will definitely write about). I will stress that this is just based on personal research I’ve been doing on agencies in LA (both before and after moving) and the Bay Area (which I have worked in and for); this is by no means comprehensive or an absolute of the offerings of these two areas. It is literally a “first impressions” kind of deal.

  1. Wraparound services and the concept of such seem to extend beyond the agencies themselves in LA. They tend to partner up with other agencies a lot more, mostly because the agencies down here appear more specialized in their missions. I’ve noticed that in the Bay, many agencies (at least the bigger ones) tend to be one-stop shops in a sense; for example, they will offer intervention or behavioral services, speech therapy, and occupational therapy in one organization.
  2. Because LA county is so freaking huge (and a pain to drive in), the agencies are much more narrow in their geographical scope here. They often have to limit themselves to certain communities, and even demographics within those communities. In the Bay Area, agencies tend to have more geographical reach and usually overlap in coverage areas. At my last job in the Bay, I had clients from Mountain View, to south San Jose, through Milpitas (google a map of the area, and you’ll see what I mean).
  3. The diversity of the type of agencies, at least for now, appears more vast in LA. Up north, there were no known agencies that utilized the Floortime/DIR method, and this was one of the reasons why I felt so left out of the autism circle there. ABA exclusively rules the land. While it also corners the market in LA county, I have found two agencies who use the Floortime method (basically unheard of in the Bay Area), and both have been in operation for well over a decade.
  4. Community outreach and connection is on a higher priority in LA. I’m not saying that it doesn’t exist in the Bay Area, because it does. I am saying, though, that it is more obvious in the agencies I’ve researched in the LA area. The agencies down here overall (and not just special needs ones) tend to create and hold their own conferences, go into lower socioeconomic areas/neighborhoods, and communicate more readily with those neighborhoods. Why? Because individuals in those neighborhoods rose up and decided to carve such agencies into creation themselves.

Overall, the LA area appears to operate a bit differently than the Bay Area, which means I will have to learn the lay of the land first before really striking out to plant my business here. So far, though, I am excited with what I see.

Ideas Everywhere!

I am going to detour from autism for just a post, because this directly relates to the programs I’m forming.

The concept of idea overload is a pretty common situation with writers. I have certainly had it in the past. You think up a story idea, you start on it, and then another story idea shoots off from that one, so you start tinkering with that new idea…and nothing ever gets finished. I seriously never thought I would have too many possible paths with regards to a business, but here I am.

There are, right now, about four possible paths I can take with SPARC. Only two of them are on this site right now. All still center around autism, but vary in approach. They each involve a different type of business plan, a slightly different network of people, slightly different goals (though the main theme is still autism acceptance), and involve different strengths of mine. I’ve been quietly testing each of them on a micro level, and all look equally promising. All of them also have interested/intrigued parties and potential partners.

This is the point where most people freeze.

A lot of us, when faced with several options, have a really hard time making a choice. This goes double if the wrong choice could (potentially) lead to a waste of resources. Even after doing market research and scouting for similar programs, it can still be difficult. I love all the programs equally, but tackling all of them at once is simply not possible this early in the game. One has to be put ahead of the others.

This is the main reason why I’ve been a bit quiet on the business side lately. I am building my network, but I am also monitoring the probability of success for each program. I have a few more emails and contacts to make, but I’m pretty sure that I will have a clear choice before the end of the April.

Ah, the joys of entrepreneurship!

Have any of you ever had a similar situation (too many potentially good ideas, not enough resources yet to execute them all)? How did you make your choices?

 

The Extra Bridge: The Workers Listen

I’m adding in an extra chapter to this series because of what went down on my personal Facebook last night.

Knowing that some of my Facebook friends are practically ABA zealots, I decided to write a segment I sometimes call “Unpopular Opinion.” In this one, I put the ABA community to task for not appearing to listen to the autistic adult community when they give their critiques and suggestions for ABA and how it is executed. I also noted how ABA has monopolized the autism field, leaving little room for any other approaches. I then ended with a dig at the new healthcare bill by Republicans, adding that if it goes through then all of this may be a pointless rant. Then I sat back and waited for the incoming torpedoes.

They didn’t come, at least not exactly.

One person did come on defending ABA as the only evidence-based practice. I then explained down thread what I called the “Catch-22 Carousel.” ABA gets funding and put onto insurance because it is evidence-based, which takes away from funding for other approaches to conduct research to…prove they’re evidence-based. That aspect of the conversation stopped soon after I made that point. When they asked where the research was, I pointed them to Stanford’s Annual Autism Symposium, which takes place in about two weeks. They genuinely seemed interested in attending.

What really made the conversation, though, was the intrigue from others over other parts of the post. I had a great conversation with one former coworker about the effects of the healthcare plans on autism services (which included our job prospects), and another conversation about offering more support to autistic adults and what that should look like (employment/workplace support was high in priority). Just about everyone agreed that there should be a variety of therapeutic services for families and clients to choose from, and to not have that is a detriment to our overall goals and why we entered this field to begin with.

Most of my Facebook friends are ABA enthusiasts, so their silence did not surprise me. I was actually impressed with the ABA Specialist who wanted to hear more about the research into the other approaches, as opposed to just ignoring or shutting down when I made my point. Another friend from back home mentioned the PEERS approach, which I had never even heard of. My rant led to a new approach (at least new for me), and I am now going to go learn more about it.

Some of the parents, meanwhile, simply liked, loved, or thanked me for the post.

The conversations that sprang from that post made me think beyond my viewpoint, go and research some things as I was replying to others, and led me to new ideas. Sometimes speaking your truth can lead others to do the same, and sometimes, everyone listens and learns something in the process.

 

The Affinity Project

This is a survey conducted by Sidekicks and Autism Speaks (I know, this surprises some of you). The survey is to identify the different passions that autistic people have. In my eyes, the information could be used to create programs and projects to help autistic people use their passions to contribute actively to society in ways that best suit them.

This is very much the general idea I had with my thesis. To see an organization like Autism Speaks, who has so much influence and yet such a turbulent relationship with the autism community, help spearhead a survey like this is very encouraging.

Oh, and it has prizes for participants, so…there’s that.

The Affinity Project