The MI Series: Naturalistic

This week covers another sometimes less-than-obvious area of intelligence: Naturalistic. Though it is often overlooked, I think there are a vast number of people who fit nicely into this type of intelligence, both on the autism spectrum and off.

Naturalistic, according to Multiple Intelligence (MI) theory author Howard Gardner, involves “recognizing and categorizing natural objects” (Gardner, Exploring Intelligence, p.22). I will take this a step further and include individuals who have an uncanny connection to nature, and those who help bridge the gap between nature and humans. John James Audubon and Jane Goodall could be included in this group, along with biologists and naturalists.

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Many of my clients have responded very positively to having pets or being out in nature. I have often watched some of them gaze at the stars, smile as the wind blows through the trees, or happily attempt to chat up a nearby squirrel.

Nature is more than just living art to those who are high in this area of intelligence. They feel a connection and a need to understand it. They can be recharged by spending time in the natural world, be it a hike, scuba diving, or gardening. These nature lovers enjoy sharing their knowledge with others, so I would consider park rangers and tour guides to be part of this category. Also included are those who fight for animal rights and environmental protection/preservation. Bottom line: there is a love/respect of nature, a desire to understand and protect it, and a goal of helping others to appreciate it.

Next week (or more likely the end of this week), we will examine Musical Intelligence.

 

Additional Reading

Frames of Mind, The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Howard Gardner. BasicBooks, 1983.

Naturalist Intelligence (a brief write-up on the intelligence area)

The 8th Intelligence (great explantation of Gardner, and early signs of a child having Naturalistic Intelligence)

 

Photo credit: Polk State College

The MI Series

I will be starting a series this week covering the different types of multiple intelligence. This theory is the cornerstone of my business/thesis, and I thought it would be nice to explore the components of it a bit more to give better insight into what I do.

The Multiple Intelligence theory itself was developed by Howard Gardner in 1983. In his book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences, he mapped out eight different types of intelligence that went beyond the traditional viewpoint of IQ. There are a few others that have been suggested, explored, and/or dismissed, but these are the core eight:

  • Visual/Spatial
  • Interpersonal
  • Intrapersonal
  • Musical
  • Naturalistic
  • Logical/Mathematical
  • Verbal/Linguistic
  • Bodily/Kinesthetic

I will more than likely touch on the proposed/suggested intelligence types at the end, since they are quite interesting themselves.

The first intelligence that will be covered later this week is Visual-Spatial, which I have seen often with regards to my autistic clients.