LA Versus Bay: Autism

I am FINALLY in LA and settling in while scoping out the apartment scene. I have also been taking the time to look at the various agencies that focus on or at least include autism therapies in their offerings. I have already seen some interesting differences between agencies in LA county, and agencies in the Bay Area, and I’m sure more will pop up (which I will definitely write about). I will stress that this is just based on personal research I’ve been doing on agencies in LA (both before and after moving) and the Bay Area (which I have worked in and for); this is by no means comprehensive or an absolute of the offerings of these two areas. It is literally a “first impressions” kind of deal.

  1. Wraparound services and the concept of such seem to extend beyond the agencies themselves in LA. They tend to partner up with other agencies a lot more, mostly because the agencies down here appear more specialized in their missions. I’ve noticed that in the Bay, many agencies (at least the bigger ones) tend to be one-stop shops in a sense; for example, they will offer intervention or behavioral services, speech therapy, and occupational therapy in one organization.
  2. Because LA county is so freaking huge (and a pain to drive in), the agencies are much more narrow in their geographical scope here. They often have to limit themselves to certain communities, and even demographics within those communities. In the Bay Area, agencies tend to have more geographical reach and usually overlap in coverage areas. At my last job in the Bay, I had clients from Mountain View, to south San Jose, through Milpitas (google a map of the area, and you’ll see what I mean).
  3. The diversity of the type of agencies, at least for now, appears more vast in LA. Up north, there were no known agencies that utilized the Floortime/DIR method, and this was one of the reasons why I felt so left out of the autism circle there. ABA exclusively rules the land. While it also corners the market in LA county, I have found two agencies who use the Floortime method (basically unheard of in the Bay Area), and both have been in operation for well over a decade.
  4. Community outreach and connection is on a higher priority in LA. I’m not saying that it doesn’t exist in the Bay Area, because it does. I am saying, though, that it is more obvious in the agencies I’ve researched in the LA area. The agencies down here overall (and not just special needs ones) tend to create and hold their own conferences, go into lower socioeconomic areas/neighborhoods, and communicate more readily with those neighborhoods. Why? Because individuals in those neighborhoods rose up and decided to carve such agencies into creation themselves.

Overall, the LA area appears to operate a bit differently than the Bay Area, which means I will have to learn the lay of the land first before really striking out to plant my business here. So far, though, I am excited with what I see.

Autism @ Work Reception: Thoughts

This past Wednesday, I was able to attend the evening reception for SAP’s Autism at Work conference. It featured a Q&A panel with three known authors in the autism world: Steve Silberman, John Elder Robison, and Dr. Stephen Shore. Robison and Shore are both autistic.

I quickly became aware that this reception (and indeed the conference itself) was attended by both neurotypical and neurodiverse individuals. It was my first time attending such an event, which was a bit bittersweet; this should be the norm for such conferences. There were even color codes on the name tags, letting everyone know each person’s level of comfort with being approached. Silberman later explained that while this was common for the autism conferences/talks he attended overseas, it was the first time he had seen the practice here in the United States. This further let me know how far behind my country is with regards to autism awareness and acceptance.

It again became clear when I asked the panel about their experiences with regards to how black and brown communities approach autism. Silberman woefully admitted that he wished he could have included more people of color in his book¬†NeuroTribes,¬†and Robison stated that the racial divide in autism is yet another symptom of the racial divide in medicine and education overall. Silberman shared a quick story of how he spoke with a black man who, when Silberman mentioned that he wrote a book about autism, basically replied, “Oh, that’s the white people disorder.” To say that the story saddened me is an understatement, but I am glad that I mustered the courage to ask about the topic. It led to several great conversations with other attendees afterwards.

This is one of the aspects of autism acceptance that hasn’t been achieved yet. There is a general awareness of it for the most part in minority communities, but it is still not understood enough in those communities to warrant full awareness. I know people who still put autism in the same category as MR, or like the man in the example, do not think it affects their community at all. A Mexican mother whose autistic son is a client of mine is very nervous about having him attend regular classes once he starts school. She would rather have him in special education classes than to face the bullying that she feels he would suffer through in mainstream classes. It broke my heart to hear that, especially since I feel her son has the potential to be able to thrive in regular classes of interest.

I want to end on a positive note, though, so here it is: The entire two day conference is a strong indicator of a shift in the business world. Companies are starting to realize the potential autistic employees have and how having neurodiverse people on their teams will help their companies grow and thrive. They recognize that hiring practices and procedures need to change and adjust; do talented individuals really need to go through a face-to-face interview? Do HR departments know how to bring in more neurodiverse applicants (right now, the answer appears to be “no”)? The questions and situations are starting to be explored and asked, which is a great step forward. Institutions are starting the slow process of change.

Here are a couple of pictures from the reception, including the books I got signed:

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