The MI Series: Intrapersonal

My series on Multiple Intelligence continues this week with one of the more “mysterious” and internal types of intelligence, which is Intrapersonal.

Last week’s post on interpersonal intelligence focused on how well we relate to others. As its name suggests, intrapersonal focuses on how we relate to ourselves and within.  According to Howard Gardner, intrapersonal intelligence refers to “accurately determining moods, feelings and other mental states in oneself” (Gardner, 1998). Included in his examples of those with high interpersonal intelligence is Mahatma Gandhi.

This is another area that is perceived to be difficult for those on the spectrum. I say “perceived” because in my professional experience many of the children and teens I have worked with tend to be able to express their own feelings and thoughts quite well when given the proper tools and channels to do so. There are a number of books, blogs, and videos where autistic intrapersonal skills are beautifully highlighted. Without the proper channels, however, it would be very difficult to identify and/or strengthen this.

When we read about mindfulness, meditation, and the process of being quiet observers of our own mind, know that these are all aspects of intrapersonal intelligence. We are able to identify our thoughts, feelings, emotional patterns, and mental blind spots so that we can function accordingly. Intrapersonal intelligence is very important for those who work to help others, particularly in “abstract” ways such as mental health and spirituality. We must be cognizant of our own thoughts, feelings, and reactions so that we are aware when we are projecting, reacting, or minimizing. Self-awareness is the key phrase for this intelligence.

self-awareness

Next week, I will go into one of my personal favorites: Naturalistic intelligence.

If you missed any of the previous posts (I linked Interpersonal above), here is my post on Visual/Spatial, and the introduction post to the entire series.

 

Additional Reading

Frames of Mind, The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Howard Gardner. BasicBooks, 1983.

What is Intrapersonal Intelligence?  Nice little write-up on what it looks like and how to teach to those who are high in this category.

Thoughtco on Interpersonal Intelligence This article includes a list of some well-known people who demonstrate high levels of instrapersonal intelligence, and includes some class-based suggestions to improve it that can be done outside of a classroom as well. Hint: journaling is a good place to start.

Photo credit: positiveactionpdc.com

The MI Series

I will be starting a series this week covering the different types of multiple intelligence. This theory is the cornerstone of my business/thesis, and I thought it would be nice to explore the components of it a bit more to give better insight into what I do.

The Multiple Intelligence theory itself was developed by Howard Gardner in 1983. In his book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences, he mapped out eight different types of intelligence that went beyond the traditional viewpoint of IQ. There are a few others that have been suggested, explored, and/or dismissed, but these are the core eight:

  • Visual/Spatial
  • Interpersonal
  • Intrapersonal
  • Musical
  • Naturalistic
  • Logical/Mathematical
  • Verbal/Linguistic
  • Bodily/Kinesthetic

I will more than likely touch on the proposed/suggested intelligence types at the end, since they are quite interesting themselves.

The first intelligence that will be covered later this week is Visual-Spatial, which I have seen often with regards to my autistic clients.