LA Versus Bay: Autism

I am FINALLY in LA and settling in while scoping out the apartment scene. I have also been taking the time to look at the various agencies that focus on or at least include autism therapies in their offerings. I have already seen some interesting differences between agencies in LA county, and agencies in the Bay Area, and I’m sure more will pop up (which I will definitely write about). I will stress that this is just based on personal research I’ve been doing on agencies in LA (both before and after moving) and the Bay Area (which I have worked in and for); this is by no means comprehensive or an absolute of the offerings of these two areas. It is literally a “first impressions” kind of deal.

  1. Wraparound services and the concept of such seem to extend beyond the agencies themselves in LA. They tend to partner up with other agencies a lot more, mostly because the agencies down here appear more specialized in their missions. I’ve noticed that in the Bay, many agencies (at least the bigger ones) tend to be one-stop shops in a sense; for example, they will offer intervention or behavioral services, speech therapy, and occupational therapy in one organization.
  2. Because LA county is so freaking huge (and a pain to drive in), the agencies are much more narrow in their geographical scope here. They often have to limit themselves to certain communities, and even demographics within those communities. In the Bay Area, agencies tend to have more geographical reach and usually overlap in coverage areas. At my last job in the Bay, I had clients from Mountain View, to south San Jose, through Milpitas (google a map of the area, and you’ll see what I mean).
  3. The diversity of the type of agencies, at least for now, appears more vast in LA. Up north, there were no known agencies that utilized the Floortime/DIR method, and this was one of the reasons why I felt so left out of the autism circle there. ABA exclusively rules the land. While it also corners the market in LA county, I have found two agencies who use the Floortime method (basically unheard of in the Bay Area), and both have been in operation for well over a decade.
  4. Community outreach and connection is on a higher priority in LA. I’m not saying that it doesn’t exist in the Bay Area, because it does. I am saying, though, that it is more obvious in the agencies I’ve researched in the LA area. The agencies down here overall (and not just special needs ones) tend to create and hold their own conferences, go into lower socioeconomic areas/neighborhoods, and communicate more readily with those neighborhoods. Why? Because individuals in those neighborhoods rose up and decided to carve such agencies into creation themselves.

Overall, the LA area appears to operate a bit differently than the Bay Area, which means I will have to learn the lay of the land first before really striking out to plant my business here. So far, though, I am excited with what I see.

Ideas Everywhere!

I am going to detour from autism for just a post, because this directly relates to the programs I’m forming.

The concept of idea overload is a pretty common situation with writers. I have certainly had it in the past. You think up a story idea, you start on it, and then another story idea shoots off from that one, so you start tinkering with that new idea…and nothing ever gets finished. I seriously never thought I would have too many possible paths with regards to a business, but here I am.

There are, right now, about four possible paths I can take with SPARC. Only two of them are on this site right now. All still center around autism, but vary in approach. They each involve a different type of business plan, a slightly different network of people, slightly different goals (though the main theme is still autism acceptance), and involve different strengths of mine. I’ve been quietly testing each of them on a micro level, and all look equally promising. All of them also have interested/intrigued parties and potential partners.

This is the point where most people freeze.

A lot of us, when faced with several options, have a really hard time making a choice. This goes double if the wrong choice could (potentially) lead to a waste of resources. Even after doing market research and scouting for similar programs, it can still be difficult. I love all the programs equally, but tackling all of them at once is simply not possible this early in the game. One has to be put ahead of the others.

This is the main reason why I’ve been a bit quiet on the business side lately. I am building my network, but I am also monitoring the probability of success for each program. I have a few more emails and contacts to make, but I’m pretty sure that I will have a clear choice before the end of the April.

Ah, the joys of entrepreneurship!

Have any of you ever had a similar situation (too many potentially good ideas, not enough resources yet to execute them all)? How did you make your choices?