This. This is why SPARC exists.

This is why I do what I do, why I want my organization to be successful. Stories like this are the reason why. Your entire life can change when you identify your life purpose and passion.

20-Year-Old with Autism And His Mother Open Bakery to Employ Others On Spectrum

Here is the link to the bakery: No Label at The Table

 

To read my MI Series, which discusses theory of multiple intelligence and the different areas of intelligence, click here. Or, catch up on the first two blogs of the series, Spatial/Visual and Interpersonal.

Job Accommodation

At one of the previous agencies I worked at, we had quite a bit of space in the very beginning as far as our office went. I remember us having several conversations amongst ourselves about creating a sort of “quiet room” for employees to relax in. We also discussed such a room for or clients, who were autistic. We even thought up designs for the space; pillows, dim lighting (no florescent lights), a small relaxation fountain, etc. Needless to say, that lovely vision never saw the light of day.

Employers are required by laws (to a…reasonable extent, I’ll say) to accommodate for people with disabilities and special needs. They are encouraged in the United States to hire such individuals so as to appear inclusive. Ideally, this would happen regularly. As someone who has worked in HR, though, I can tell you that I have often witnessed quite the opposite.

That brings me to the article below. The consulting form EY talks with The Atlantic about hiring and accommodating autistic employees. To do this, every aspect of hiring and retaining had to be re-examined, from interviews, to interviews, to company culture. EY took this into consideration on all levels, and as a result has a more talented and complex employee demographic.

A lot of the tech companies are starting to actively adjust themselves in order to tap into a population who can make great employees if they are given the opportunity. Right now, EY is placing these employees in areas such as cybersecurity. My hope is that other industries will start to create similar programs to recruit and retain autistic individuals.

EY Describes it Program for Autistic Employees

A Letter To Disney

Over the last few months, I have been both amazed and greatly encouraged by the amount of autism awareness that is starting to be raised in the private sector. While other parts of the world have certainly been ahead of us Americans in that sense, we are starting to realize the potential of a workforce that companies have not given much of a chance in the past.

Disney has been a regular source of enjoyment and bridge-building for many of my clients, regardless of their demographics. Being a Disney kid/adult myself, I personally know what impact it has. I remember the joy (again, as an adult) at seeing an African-American Disney princess emerge on the scene with The Princess and the Frog. The Disney brand has significant clout in the world, and that includes the autism world within it. For many of the families I’ve worked with, being familiar with Disney gave a clinician a much greater chance at earning the trust of our clients.

The article below is from an autistic adult who now speaks with corporations and organizations to make the case for hiring his demographic. He also does an aspect of what I like to do, which is train the current workforce on working with autistic employees and coworkers.

A Letter To Disney

The Extra Bridge: The Workers Listen

I’m adding in an extra chapter to this series because of what went down on my personal Facebook last night.

Knowing that some of my Facebook friends are practically ABA zealots, I decided to write a segment I sometimes call “Unpopular Opinion.” In this one, I put the ABA community to task for not appearing to listen to the autistic adult community when they give their critiques and suggestions for ABA and how it is executed. I also noted how ABA has monopolized the autism field, leaving little room for any other approaches. I then ended with a dig at the new healthcare bill by Republicans, adding that if it goes through then all of this may be a pointless rant. Then I sat back and waited for the incoming torpedoes.

They didn’t come, at least not exactly.

One person did come on defending ABA as the only evidence-based practice. I then explained down thread what I called the “Catch-22 Carousel.” ABA gets funding and put onto insurance because it is evidence-based, which takes away from funding for other approaches to conduct research to…prove they’re evidence-based. That aspect of the conversation stopped soon after I made that point. When they asked where the research was, I pointed them to Stanford’s Annual Autism Symposium, which takes place in about two weeks. They genuinely seemed interested in attending.

What really made the conversation, though, was the intrigue from others over other parts of the post. I had a great conversation with one former coworker about the effects of the healthcare plans on autism services (which included our job prospects), and another conversation about offering more support to autistic adults and what that should look like (employment/workplace support was high in priority). Just about everyone agreed that there should be a variety of therapeutic services for families and clients to choose from, and to not have that is a detriment to our overall goals and why we entered this field to begin with.

Most of my Facebook friends are ABA enthusiasts, so their silence did not surprise me. I was actually impressed with the ABA Specialist who wanted to hear more about the research into the other approaches, as opposed to just ignoring or shutting down when I made my point. Another friend from back home mentioned the PEERS approach, which I had never even heard of. My rant led to a new approach (at least new for me), and I am now going to go learn more about it.

Some of the parents, meanwhile, simply liked, loved, or thanked me for the post.

The conversations that sprang from that post made me think beyond my viewpoint, go and research some things as I was replying to others, and led me to new ideas. Sometimes speaking your truth can lead others to do the same, and sometimes, everyone listens and learns something in the process.