UC Davis MIND autism study

UC Davis’ MIND Institute is launching a study about anxiety and autism for children ages 8-12 years old. They are looking to see what types of treatments are best for these individuals. The focus seems to be on CBT (Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy) versus medications. Participants get free treatment and apparently $100 for each assessment performed. This is mainly for those in the northern California area.

Here is the link to the video discussing the launch of the study:

 

Here is a link to more info about the study on the MIND Institute’s site: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/centers/ace/ace-staar.html

You can also check the “Research” tab on the study’s page to see all of the studies they are currently running. I have heard several people from the MIND Institute speak at various events, and I love the work that they do.

Parents, We Need You.

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First, yes, it’s been awhile. A lot has been going on over here, including some big decisions that will probably be announced in the June site update.

A recent situation has caused me to take a hard look at the idea of “parent buy-in.” It’s a bit of a buzzword/concept in my field, and it centers around the goal of getting the family invested in our therapy work. Too often, I see parents who simply hand their child/children off to the therapist/interventionist/specialist and basically say, “Here, fix them.”

The truth, parents and guardians, is that we cannot “fix” your child. First of all, many of us don’t really like the idea of “fixing” anyone. It implies that the individual is broken, inferior, or not up to some invisible set of societal standards. Second, we are in your home/community or you are in our office a few hours a week.

In order for your son or daughter to become the best that they can be, they need YOU.

In order for us to be able to find those sparks in your son or daughter, we need YOU.

I always try to tell families at the very beginning that this is a team effort, and everyone must be invested in it. The clients I worked with who blossomed the most were the ones who had the support and follow-through from their parents/guardians, their siblings, and even extended family. The families who were sponges, hungry for information, skills, and concrete examples…these were the cases that led to more fulfilled lives. No, the child didn’t get “fixed.” The child got love and acceptance, and that made them work at becoming more confident, loving, and ready. All children want to receive acceptance and praise from their parents/loved ones, I truly believe that.

When the families meet us at the table, ready to make the world of their family unit a better place, amazing things happen. I’ve seen it over and over again.

I have a saying when meeting families: “My end goal is to essentially be fired because you don’t need me anymore.” I don’t want your family to become dependent on me or my team. I want you to apply learned skills and build relationship bonds so that you don’t need my “expertise” anymore.

Us professionals want to see the child AND the family unit flourish and thrive independent of any services or interventions.

This needs to be everyone’s goal.

black and white boy child childhood
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Tuesday Thoughts

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I think Tuesday posts are going to be the days where all of my not-quite-realized post ideas are going to go. So, without further adieu…

  • Reading the thoughts of a young adult on the spectrum (via Facebook) has been one of the biggest eye openers for me, because he brings up situations and viewpoints that I never conceived of.
  • The autism world with regards to therapeutic approaches is becoming increasingly marginalized. It’s like being in a circle surrounded by base camps…and you are either not invited to them, or you don’t quite agree with them. Interesting position to be in…and a great launching space to create your own base camp.
  • A parent told me that she was confused when someone asked her what her son’s “special gift” was. She shrugged and replied, “I told her that I didn’t know what it was or what she meant.” I glanced at him, looked back at her, and thought, “Spatial intelligence.” I don’t really see them as gifts, though.
  • I follow several families on the @sparcguidance on Instagram. They are all composed of pure awesome, and I love that they are sharing their journeys. It’s not easy and not for everyone, but I appreciate it.
  • A 2-minute questionnaire has been developed by researchers at Rutgers University that could identify autism in children much younger than the average age of around 5 years old. You can read more about the questionnaire here and here. This is fascinating, especially since it appeared accurate across different socioeconomic groups. I think that has a lot to do with the fact that the questions are in layman’s terms, as opposed to overly academic or analytic jargon.
  • Finally, a multiple intelligence note: As I’ve mentioned in my post on spatial intelligence, I’ve noticed that quite a few of my clients have been above average or exceptional in this category, regardless of sex, race, etc. It is not the easiest intelligence to spot, though. So here is a tip for parents: Someone with high spatial intelligence is often good at building, but they may be also really good at directions and orientating themselves to areas. They are really good at games that focus on spatial strategy (like Blockus or Tetris-like games), and can probably help with putting things together, be it a Lego set or that new chair for the living room. The key to remember in any of the intelligences, though, is that the person enjoys it. If they love it and are good at it, you have potentially found their purpose.

Programing Note: We’re on the lookout for guest bloggers, so please drop us a line at sparcguidance@gmail.com if you want to write something about autism, multiple intelligence, life purpose, etc.  We’re also working on our first workshop on multiple intelligence and uncovering them! We will give more information once everything is finalized, but we are definitely excited about it!

Have a great week!

Thursday Thoughts

After dealing with hurricanes threatening most of the people I know, some family crisis, and a generally busy schedule, I have emerged from oblivion!

The article that pulled me out of, well, life was a somewhat familiar trope for me in this field: the hunt for a “cure” at any cost. This time, though, the focus was an approach I had never heard anything negative about until now.

I have heard about the Son-Rise approach off and on throughout my career. For some reason, it was often interchanged with the DIR/Floortime approach, which is different but seems to have a similar thread of being more naturalistic. I noticed, though, that I didn’t see many families in my work attempting this approach. I went on to study Floortime and ABA more closely, becoming an advocate of the Early Start Denver Model’s combination of the best of both worlds.

This article, though, really looks at what happened when autism therapy became a business. It aims mostly at Son-Rise, but the pattern is pretty familiar for any family who has uncovered every stone in a search for answers. They really go to all corners for their children, and sometimes people/organizations take advantage of that by suggesting that they have all of the answers.

I wanted to say this much: Parents, I know you see many of us as experts, the ones to come in and “fix” everything. I do not see that as my job, and I know others who feel this way. I want to empower YOU, because at the end of the day, you are the ones who love and are with this individual 24/7. Yes, I know lots of terminology. Yes, I have seen lots of clients and gained great insight into the world of autism. I still need YOU. Your child/teen/adult still needs YOU. After every therapy session, homeopathic oil blend, or new breakthrough, it still comes down to you and them. In all honesty, I learn more from my clients than any book, training, or degree program can possibly teach me. They are some of the most amazing people I have ever met, and so are their families.

Anyway, coming off of a really great session yesterday, I wanted to share that. The session wasn’t great because the client had “perfect behavior.” It was great because everyone (me, the parent, and the client) learned something.

I feel like I’m rambling randomly (and I probably am), but I wanted to share those thoughts. The article is below, and opens up quite a dialogue about the Son-Rise approach in particular. Oh, and shout out to one of my former coworkers, Andrew Shahan, who is featured in this article and who I count as one of my favorite trainers. 🙂

A ‘cure’ for autism at any cost

The Value of Connection

I saw an article today on the results of a study about music therapy and autism. The study indicated that “improvisational music therapy, compared with enhanced standard care, resulted in no significant difference in symptom severity based on the ADOS social affect domain over 5 months” (Bieleninik L. et al. JAMA 318, 525-535 (2017).

This is a bit of a letdown to many in the music therapy world, but it is also a call to action of sorts. Some of therapies outside the normal scope of the traditional autism therapies (including music and listening therapies, dance therapy, drama therapy, etc.) can take a lesson from this study.

By improving and adjusting the therapies to accommodate individual differences, focus on connection/engagement, and folding the parents/family into therapy, there may be clearer and more positive results. I have noticed this to be the case in many of the more “traditional” and clinical therapeutic approaches.

I have seen clients improve from these more art-related therapies, but a key component to client success lies not necessarily in the therapy itself (though it may certainly help, of course). The key is connection and relationship. In an article about the study on spectrumnews.org, it was noted that other studies have indicated that having a connection with the music therapist improved clients’ social skills. Working on creating a connection is, in my eyes, the most important part of any autism therapy. If you have engagement, you will naturally be able to do more with and for your client.

Below is a direct link to the article about the study. I would love to hear others’ thoughts about this. Have you tried music therapy before? Did it help? What was the experience with the music therapist like?

Music therapy for autism shows minimal social benefit

 

Female + Autistic = Ignored

Thinking back on all of the clients that I have had, few of them have been both female and autistic. While I have seen numerous mothers who (to me) clearly had the textbook signs of autism, they never had a diagnosis and often presented as more worn and drained than their counterparts.

This is a very real issue in the autism world. I’ve said this before, but looking back at my traits as a preschooler, I had some signs myself. They were never addressed or even brought up aside from one random report. I couldn’t sit still during circle time, had a strange fascination with beating/cleaning the erasers, and played alongside kids rather than with them. I was humorously labeled a “non-conformist,” and that was that.

I’m not saying I’m on the spectrum, but really, how would I know? It’s never been given as a possibility, often because I was too well-behaved (read: quiet), did excellent in school, had friends, etc. The truth of the matter is that the medical and mental health communities do not look for autism in girls/women like they do with boys/men, and this needs to change.

The articles below do a nice job of discussing this further, if you wish to do some more reading into it:

Girls with autism getting a rough deal

Diagnosed at 45 with autism