The Puzzle Piece & SPARC

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I wanted to post this before releasing the next workshop flyer, because this symbol has gotten a very mixed reaction from the autism community…and rightfully so.

The puzzle piece has become a standard symbol for autism worldwide, from representing entire organizations to being featured on necklaces and bumper stickers. For both sides of the coin, it symbolizes autism being a bit of a mystery, a puzzle to be solved and completed. For some, it represents hope that answers may be found. For others, it is dismissive of their lives and experiences.

For SPARC and its mission, it represents something entirely different.

The purpose of SPARC is to educate, and though we don’t adopt the puzzle piece as our symbol (nor will we ever do so), we embrace a different meaning for it.

For SPARC, the puzzle represents connecting the pieces for minority communities.

It means connecting “stranded” families to resources and assistance.

It means establishing support systems for those on the spectrum and their caregivers in these communities.

It means linking a community together in awareness, acceptance, affirmation, and advocacy.

So, when you see the puzzle piece on any flyers or marketing for SPARC, know that it carries a completely different meaning for us. It doesn’t represent autism itself, but rather represents underserved communities being given much needed tools to assist with autism.

Quick Autism News Roundup

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A couple of big things happened in the last two weeks or so with autism, and I wanted to compile them.

House Passes Autism Act: The US House of Representatives voted to allow $1.8 billion to be allocated to autism (research, programs, training, etc.) with the continuation of the CARES Act through 2024. The bill now goes to the US Senate, but it needs to pass fairly quickly; the current CARES Act expires at the end of September, and its lapse may mean a lapse in funds for services and research across the country.

What happened, Sesame Street?: I am in the process of writing a blog post for this, but ASAN (Autistic Self-Advocacy Network) has severed ties with Sesame Street after the children’s company teamed up with Autism Speaks for its latest round of PSAs.

“New” Ideas About Autism: I file this under “Wait, you didn’t know this?” A research team concludes that (surprise!) autistic individuals have reasons for their behaviors like lack of eye contact and often do desire social interaction to some degree.

“My experience of living with autism”: I always appreciate first-hand accounts from autistic individuals, especially since they almost always shatter at least preconceived notion I have heard from neurotypicals. This writing is from May, but I wanted to share it.

Countdown!

We are only a few days away from the first West Palm Beach class “Hello Autism” this Saturday!

I checked out the space today to make sure the equipment and setup would work, and yes, it will have a similar setup to this. I want this to be a discussion as much as it is a workshop, and I want it to become a regular occurrence.

If you haven’t reserved a spot yet, it’s FREE and there are still spaces available! Click here to go directly to the event and register!

I love Sesame Street

ipanews_3586256d-6c91-4719-9c82-71774b49529f_1       John E. Barret/PA Images

I remember watching this show a lot as a child. Just to further date myself, I remember the Big Bird movie “Follow That Bird,” and I can faintly recall visiting Sesame Place in Texas before it closed.

So of course, seeing one of my favorite childhood shows stepping up for families and communities warms my heart. They have so many great resources and tools online for families of all types, including those touched by autism. Topics include autism (of course), community violence, financial education, and more! This website is a treasure chest of information, activities, and even professional development webinars. If you haven’t visited it yet, the link is below. The more resources, the better!

Sesame Street in Communities

Why SPARC Exists

These two recent stories, each with widely different results, illustrate very clearly why this company exists.

 

First, to train more people to respond like this:

Mother credits Universal Orlando employee for helping calm autistic child (click on the “see more” in  the mother’s Facebook entry for her entire story…it’s worth the read)

 

And second, to train more people to refrain from nonsense like this:

Teacher mocks autistic student with ‘most annoying’ award

 

Kudos to @UniversalORL for the actions of your obviously well-trained staff!

And to the Bailey Preparatory Academy and the Gary Community School Corporation…I’m available to offer autism trainings. 🙂

 

Spectrum: A Story of the Mind

I strongly encourage everyone to watch this video, because it is amazing. I agree with Dr. Grandin in this film; we should focus on the sensory input just as much, if not more, than the social skills when it comes to autism treatment. It’s about 23 minutes long, but so worth it. I may make this required viewing for my workshops in the future; I like it that much.

Also, the last adult interviewed in the film is Nick Walker, one of the first autistic adults that I had ever met. I actually had him look over my thesis proposal (which was about autism and multiple intelligence) some years ago. He was also the first person to make it clear to me that most adults like himself refer to themselves as autistic, not “a person on the spectrum.” I was pleasantly surprised to see him in this, and yes, he is very good at Aikido!

If the embedded video does not appear (it was acting funny while I was writing the post), then the direct link is also below.

Spectrum: A Story of the Mind

Data Puzzles

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There is a lot of emphasis on data in the autism field, especially since Applied Behavior Analysis has a monopoly on the field right now (unfortunately). Everything is data driven, meaning that numbers must support everything. Success is measured in data. Research is (of course) measured by data. Intervention techniques soar or crash based on data.

So what happens when the data confuses people?

A recent study on autism prevalence in 4 year-olds is doing just that, because some of the data doesn’t make sense. For example, if the number of diagnosed kiddos below age 3 decreased in New Jersey, then why is the prevalence number increasing? One possibility is that the number of professionals trained to diagnose and treat autism is low and not increasing with the demand. Having been in three different metropolitan areas in the last 3 years (Bay Area, LA, and Palm Beach County), I can attest to this suggestion. There aren’t enough of us.

The link to an article about the study is below. New Jersey was one of the states examined because it appears to have the highest prevalence in the country right now, but also has a huge array of resources. They also said that because of this, NJ probably has the most accurate information in the study.

New autism prevalence stats spotlight challenge of early diagnosis