Cats Goes Autism-Friendly!

I got the privilege  to see this amazing play years ago, and loved it. Now, Cats will be adapted for an autism-friendly audience on Broadway this summer.

This is the seventh season of the Autism Theatre Initiative (ATI). The previous season included The Lion King (amazing movie AND an amazing play) and Kinky Boots. See the link below for more information!

Autism-Friendly Broadway

LA Versus Bay: Autism

I am FINALLY in LA and settling in while scoping out the apartment scene. I have also been taking the time to look at the various agencies that focus on or at least include autism therapies in their offerings. I have already seen some interesting differences between agencies in LA county, and agencies in the Bay Area, and I’m sure more will pop up (which I will definitely write about). I will stress that this is just based on personal research I’ve been doing on agencies in LA (both before and after moving) and the Bay Area (which I have worked in and for); this is by no means comprehensive or an absolute of the offerings of these two areas. It is literally a “first impressions” kind of deal.

  1. Wraparound services and the concept of such seem to extend beyond the agencies themselves in LA. They tend to partner up with other agencies a lot more, mostly because the agencies down here appear more specialized in their missions. I’ve noticed that in the Bay, many agencies (at least the bigger ones) tend to be one-stop shops in a sense; for example, they will offer intervention or behavioral services, speech therapy, and occupational therapy in one organization.
  2. Because LA county is so freaking huge (and a pain to drive in), the agencies are much more narrow in their geographical scope here. They often have to limit themselves to certain communities, and even demographics within those communities. In the Bay Area, agencies tend to have more geographical reach and usually overlap in coverage areas. At my last job in the Bay, I had clients from Mountain View, to south San Jose, through Milpitas (google a map of the area, and you’ll see what I mean).
  3. The diversity of the type of agencies, at least for now, appears more vast in LA. Up north, there were no known agencies that utilized the Floortime/DIR method, and this was one of the reasons why I felt so left out of the autism circle there. ABA exclusively rules the land. While it also corners the market in LA county, I have found two agencies who use the Floortime method (basically unheard of in the Bay Area), and both have been in operation for well over a decade.
  4. Community outreach and connection is on a higher priority in LA. I’m not saying that it doesn’t exist in the Bay Area, because it does. I am saying, though, that it is more obvious in the agencies I’ve researched in the LA area. The agencies down here overall (and not just special needs ones) tend to create and hold their own conferences, go into lower socioeconomic areas/neighborhoods, and communicate more readily with those neighborhoods. Why? Because individuals in those neighborhoods rose up and decided to carve such agencies into creation themselves.

Overall, the LA area appears to operate a bit differently than the Bay Area, which means I will have to learn the lay of the land first before really striking out to plant my business here. So far, though, I am excited with what I see.

Teaching The Teachers

Last week, I had a team meeting with staff that I don’t see on a day to day basis. Being independent contractors, we are all rarely in the office. Opportunities to interact and review case studies are welcomed meetings.

At one point, I was discussing a case of one of my younger kiddos, who has Down Syndrome. When I causally said “my Down Syndrome client,” my supervisor corrected me by saying, “You mean your client with Down Syndrome.”

I paused, and then nodded. “Right, sorry. I guess my autism references rubbed off, because I often say ‘autistic adults’ or ‘autistic children,’ because the adults on the spectrum I’ve talked to prefer I say it that way.”

You should have seen the shock that swept across the table. “REALLY?!” they all exclaimed. This was a table of developmental specialists, speech therapists, and occupational therapists who have all had at least one autistic client at some point. This was a newsflash for them.

This is by no means a definite across all autistic adults, because of course I don’t know all of them. What the above exchange does highlight, however, is the continued disconnect between intervention workers/programs and autistic individuals. I myself did not realize how much of a disconnect there was until I started researching ABA and how clients view the approach versus how ABA proponents do (spoiler alert: there is a HUGE disconnect). I then started looking at the different agencies and organizations that focus on autism…no signs of any autistic individuals in the agencies’ upper administration, even as an advisory position.

The organization I contract with is not really focused on autism, so I sort of give its staff and workers the benefit of the doubt. For more obvious ones like Autism Speaks, though, I think it is a warranted criticism. How can you properly support a group if you don’t include them in your organization? I’ve made a similar comparison before, but to me it is like creating the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), and then having an all white board at its head.

Bottom line, I’m glad to have shared that insight with my fellow professionals, but in reality, I really shouldn’t have had to.