Being Aware/Autism Awareness Month

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Don’t worry, I didn’t miss the fact that April is Autism Awareness Month. Now that I’m settled, I wanted to give my own take on the month.

I saw this quote a few days ago, and it stuck with me. I’ve experienced this recently myself, and it does make you laugh when people think that they know you and actually don’t have a clue.

This was one of the first lessons I learned working with special needs children, particularly those on the autism spectrum. I had to learn that a vast majority of my clients knew exactly what they needed; the problem was that us “experts” weren’t listening. We were assuming that we knew what they needed. So naturally, we were met with resistance. For some of these so-called experts, the solution to that resistance is to push back harder, to literally break the spirit of the client so that they conform. Even in the beginning, I had an issue with this.

Instead, I chose to drop into the client’s world. I wanted to see how they saw things. While I can probably never know exactly how the world is to them, this simple state of being made me more aware of their awareness. The repeated actions aren’t mindless, but an attempt to regulate (same as how neurotypicals have quirks like biting our nails when nervous…except here you’re nervous most of the time). In doing this, I also quickly learned to never talk about them (in a negative way, especially) within earshot, because just like anyone else, they can tell if you’re talking about them. They may not be able to verbally tell you, but trust me, it will come out in some way. I’ve had to remind many parents and peers about this.

Finally, having said all of that…they can tell you more about themselves that I ever could. In these final days of April, I urge you to follow an autistic individual’s blog, Instagram, Tumblr, etc. You will see, hear, and feel the struggles and triumphs from those who live it, rather than those who work with them. I’ve included a few I follow that are awesome people (and yes, the number of women listed was kind of on purpose). If you are on the spectrum and have a social media presence (or know someone who does), leave your links in the comments as well. I’m going to try and highlight more of your voices going forward!

Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/astimmypuzzlepiece/

https://www.instagram.com/girlonthespectrum/

 

Blogs/Sites:

https://davidsnape.me

https://neurodivergentrebel.com

Settling In

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*Pretty accurate depiction of what the view was like for most of my road trip, give or take a few highway lanes. 

Sorry for the lack of updates! My main focus has been this move from CA to FL, which finally happened late last week. After dwindling my belongings down to whatever fits inside a Mazda 3, driving a huge chunk of I-10, and trying to adjust to the multiple time zones I had just rode/driven through, I am finally feeling a bit more centered.

I stumbled upon this article on girls with autism that I wanted to share. I find it interesting because it is from Australia, and they have developed a separate set of guidelines for diagnosing girls/women on the autism spectrum. Having had autistic girls as clients in the past, their guidelines look pretty spot on to me.

I do believe that it’ll take a special set of guidelines to diagnose girls and women, and I think this will go double for minority girls and women who already tend to get the short end of the diagnostic stick. In any case, it’s a good, quick read and a piece that I think practitioners here in the States should take note of.

Girls with autism flying under the radar

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-24/when-mother-and-daughter-are-both-on-autism-spectrum/9662966

Video: Autism in the Workplace

This is a video from CBS about some of the programs major companies like Microsoft and SAP are using to invite and grow autistic talent to them. I attended part of  last year’s Autism at Work conference mentioned in the video, and it was a very inspiring and informative experience. Here’s my blog post about that experience.

Thanks to @beautmindstalk for posting this, and for the follow!

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-growing-acceptance-of-autism-in-the-workplace/

Tuesday Thoughts

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I think Tuesday posts are going to be the days where all of my not-quite-realized post ideas are going to go. So, without further adieu…

  • Reading the thoughts of a young adult on the spectrum (via Facebook) has been one of the biggest eye openers for me, because he brings up situations and viewpoints that I never conceived of.
  • The autism world with regards to therapeutic approaches is becoming increasingly marginalized. It’s like being in a circle surrounded by base camps…and you are either not invited to them, or you don’t quite agree with them. Interesting position to be in…and a great launching space to create your own base camp.
  • A parent told me that she was confused when someone asked her what her son’s “special gift” was. She shrugged and replied, “I told her that I didn’t know what it was or what she meant.” I glanced at him, looked back at her, and thought, “Spatial intelligence.” I don’t really see them as gifts, though.
  • I follow several families on the @sparcguidance on Instagram. They are all composed of pure awesome, and I love that they are sharing their journeys. It’s not easy and not for everyone, but I appreciate it.
  • A 2-minute questionnaire has been developed by researchers at Rutgers University that could identify autism in children much younger than the average age of around 5 years old. You can read more about the questionnaire here and here. This is fascinating, especially since it appeared accurate across different socioeconomic groups. I think that has a lot to do with the fact that the questions are in layman’s terms, as opposed to overly academic or analytic jargon.
  • Finally, a multiple intelligence note: As I’ve mentioned in my post on spatial intelligence, I’ve noticed that quite a few of my clients have been above average or exceptional in this category, regardless of sex, race, etc. It is not the easiest intelligence to spot, though. So here is a tip for parents: Someone with high spatial intelligence is often good at building, but they may be also really good at directions and orientating themselves to areas. They are really good at games that focus on spatial strategy (like Blockus or Tetris-like games), and can probably help with putting things together, be it a Lego set or that new chair for the living room. The key to remember in any of the intelligences, though, is that the person enjoys it. If they love it and are good at it, you have potentially found their purpose.

Programing Note: We’re on the lookout for guest bloggers, so please drop us a line at sparcguidance@gmail.com if you want to write something about autism, multiple intelligence, life purpose, etc.  We’re also working on our first workshop on multiple intelligence and uncovering them! We will give more information once everything is finalized, but we are definitely excited about it!

Have a great week!

New Year Prep: 2018 Edition

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Hello! Whew, we made it through 2017!

I hope everyone had a wonderful week full of holiday festivities!

With 2018 right around the corner (like, literally), I will be doing some tweaking of things on the site. I’m not sure if I want a brand new layout or not, but I’m playing around with the idea.

I will also be looking into collaborating with other bloggers to do guests posts, making/posting videos, and giving case studies. In other words, it’s about to get a lot more interactive!

Finally, I really want to do some workshops in several possible areas, including LA, the Bay Area, South Florida, and even New York City. I will keep everyone posted!

So while I may be quiet for the next week or so, trust that I am working on really making SPARC Guidance into something amazing. I hope all of you join me for the ride.

Have a wonderful, fun, and safe New Year, and I will see everyone in 2018!

 

Race and Autism Diagnosis: Study

We need to talk about this.

Being African-American and working in the autism field, I have certainly noticed that there are very few of my race that I have treated and worked with in my decade in the field. In fact, I can count the number of black clients that I’ve had on one hand. It begs the question of why. This study I read about today starts to shed light on this question.

In the article about the study (both are linked below), “white parents were 2.61 times more likely to report a social concern and 4.12 times more likely to report a concern about restricted and repetitive behaviors” than black parents. They didn’t go too deeply into why, but from experience I can think of a few reasons.

First, there is an idea floating through my community that autism is a “white people” condition. The low diagnosis rate in the black community (which has its own reasons below) is cited as the reason for this belief. This is part of a much larger problem with the community: lack of trust in the medical field, and a belief in long disproven theories about autism. I cannot begin to tell you how many times I’ve had to disprove the autism/vaccine connection theory with my own people.

Second, the black and brown communities are simply not getting educated about autism (probably partly due to the reason above). Because of this, they are often unaware of the more obvious symptoms that were mentioned in the article and the study. In many cases, the symptoms are dismissed as the child misbehaving or just being “not quite right” (I’ve heard this one more than I care to admit). This sets up for a later diagnosis, which leads to delayed treatment, which leads to a more difficult time overall.

I hope to be one who expands the awareness and acceptance of autism into my own community; it could help enhance the lives of a still unknown number of autistic individuals that stand in the midst of the African-American community.

 

Race and Autism Diagnosis study

Article on study by MedicalXress

Thursday Thoughts

After dealing with hurricanes threatening most of the people I know, some family crisis, and a generally busy schedule, I have emerged from oblivion!

The article that pulled me out of, well, life was a somewhat familiar trope for me in this field: the hunt for a “cure” at any cost. This time, though, the focus was an approach I had never heard anything negative about until now.

I have heard about the Son-Rise approach off and on throughout my career. For some reason, it was often interchanged with the DIR/Floortime approach, which is different but seems to have a similar thread of being more naturalistic. I noticed, though, that I didn’t see many families in my work attempting this approach. I went on to study Floortime and ABA more closely, becoming an advocate of the Early Start Denver Model’s combination of the best of both worlds.

This article, though, really looks at what happened when autism therapy became a business. It aims mostly at Son-Rise, but the pattern is pretty familiar for any family who has uncovered every stone in a search for answers. They really go to all corners for their children, and sometimes people/organizations take advantage of that by suggesting that they have all of the answers.

I wanted to say this much: Parents, I know you see many of us as experts, the ones to come in and “fix” everything. I do not see that as my job, and I know others who feel this way. I want to empower YOU, because at the end of the day, you are the ones who love and are with this individual 24/7. Yes, I know lots of terminology. Yes, I have seen lots of clients and gained great insight into the world of autism. I still need YOU. Your child/teen/adult still needs YOU. After every therapy session, homeopathic oil blend, or new breakthrough, it still comes down to you and them. In all honesty, I learn more from my clients than any book, training, or degree program can possibly teach me. They are some of the most amazing people I have ever met, and so are their families.

Anyway, coming off of a really great session yesterday, I wanted to share that. The session wasn’t great because the client had “perfect behavior.” It was great because everyone (me, the parent, and the client) learned something.

I feel like I’m rambling randomly (and I probably am), but I wanted to share those thoughts. The article is below, and opens up quite a dialogue about the Son-Rise approach in particular. Oh, and shout out to one of my former coworkers, Andrew Shahan, who is featured in this article and who I count as one of my favorite trainers. 🙂

A ‘cure’ for autism at any cost

Female + Autistic = Ignored

Thinking back on all of the clients that I have had, few of them have been both female and autistic. While I have seen numerous mothers who (to me) clearly had the textbook signs of autism, they never had a diagnosis and often presented as more worn and drained than their counterparts.

This is a very real issue in the autism world. I’ve said this before, but looking back at my traits as a preschooler, I had some signs myself. They were never addressed or even brought up aside from one random report. I couldn’t sit still during circle time, had a strange fascination with beating/cleaning the erasers, and played alongside kids rather than with them. I was humorously labeled a “non-conformist,” and that was that.

I’m not saying I’m on the spectrum, but really, how would I know? It’s never been given as a possibility, often because I was too well-behaved (read: quiet), did excellent in school, had friends, etc. The truth of the matter is that the medical and mental health communities do not look for autism in girls/women like they do with boys/men, and this needs to change.

The articles below do a nice job of discussing this further, if you wish to do some more reading into it:

Girls with autism getting a rough deal

Diagnosed at 45 with autism