Autism Increase, Racial Disparities

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) here in the United States has confirmed what I think a lot of us in the field have suspected for awhile. While the above link is to the report itself, you can click here for another summary of the report by Disability Scoop.

First, the rate of autism has increased from 1 in 59 to 1 in 54. The CDC believes that this is more than likely due to the increase of identifying and diagnosing.

When it comes to racial breakdown, the report states that for the first time, the rate of prevalence is the same for white and black children. This seemingly debunks a long-held mindset within my own community that “blacks don’t get autism.”

Now, the differences pop up when it comes to the age of diagnosis. While black children have made minimal gains here (meaning that they’re starting to get diagnosed more), they are still behind their white counterparts with regards to the age of diagnosis and start of services (meaning they are still getting diagnosed later). Worse still, hispanic children are behind both white and black children with regards to diagnosis.

Another difference is the access to services and early intervention. The report mentions that there continues to be a gap between services obtained by white families and services obtained by minority families. The age at which these services are obtained also appear to be different, with white families getting a diagnosis and early intervention sooner.

One of the goals of SPARC is to minimize these gaps. So, tell us: what would you want to see from SPARC to help bridge these gaps?