Overwatch and Autism

A lot of you probably have no idea what the title of this post is concerning, but I also bet that a good number of you do.

Since I work with kids, I am slightly familiar with Overwatch. It is an extremely popular, shooter-style video game with a multitude of characters to play as. In fact, the sheer diversity of the characters is one of the game’s best attributes in my opinion, which leads to the article below and my thoughts on it.

It is mentioned in the article how introducing a character on the spectrum in such a subtle way as it is done in this game is a deviation from the normal approach by the entertainment world. Usually, it is either blasted in neon letters that a character is autistic, or there are no such characters to begin with.  Symmetra, the character who is at the center of this article, is a female fighter with a love for order. She is perfectly content to leave a battle to set up a stronger defense, tends to miss social cues, and can get overwhelmed. Even her name suggests a desire for balance, for all things to be in symmetry.

Another aspect of the article that I appreciated was the note that the word autistic is still used as an insult online, which is very true. I cringe when I see it hurled in such a manner on message and comment boards, and rarely is the speaker corrected. The author of the article, Andrew McMillen, and many that he interviewed echoed my hope that introducing more characters like Symmetra may lead to wider autism acceptance.

The article is below, from WIRED magazine:

Video Games Are Being Transformed By This Autistic Character 

 

New Series

After thinking about it for awhile, I decided to write a series about how I work with my clients. I have met many newcomers to the autism therapy community, some coming into their very first job, and they often hit the ground running with very little knowledge of how to interact with their new client. In the companies that I have worked for, most of the training falls on the lower level supervisors. Unfortunately, they are usually swamped and can’t do full on training until their schedules allow them to shadow or meet with their employees. I know this because I have been the supervisor before.

My hope is that this series of articles will help incoming interventionists and specialists look at their charges not from the standpoint of data collection or trial running, but from the standpoint of relationship building and earning trust. While every client is different, there are some universal truths to interacting with any human being that (for some odd reason) I have sometimes seen ignored when dealing with autism.

I will probably start this early next week, walking you through my experiences as a therapist, interventionist, and specialist. I hope that some of you that are new to your positions and the field get a feel for what sessions can be like, and why you really shouldn’t take a lot of things personal or be too hard on yourself. For those who are “veterans,” I hope to remind you of why you do the work that you do. 🙂

Next week’s first article is: The Approach

Autism Empathy Kit

First, a lovely Happy New Year to all of you! I hope you had as much fun saying goodbye to 2016 as I did!

Being that my business is all about expanding autism awareness and acceptance, I was intrigued by this article about an empathy kit. It was created by a design student who has an autistic sibling. It addresses quite a few of the sensory challenges of autism, including taste, hearing, and vision. Combining something like this with my presentations could make for an even more engaging experience for those who take the trainings.

Check out the article and let me know what you think. Is this a good start on such a concept? What would you add or adjust with the kit?

Autism Empathy Kit

Also, if you know any groups or organizations who would love an interactive and informative introduction to understanding autism, send them to my classes page or drop me an email!