Awareness v. Acceptance

 

white blue and purple stars illustration
Photo by Bich Tran on Pexels.com

April actually has two meanings, depending on where you stand in the autism community.

For most who work in the field, it is Autism Awareness Month: a month of “Light It Up Blue,” fundraising, and quoting a lot from Autism Speaks. It’s about posts of what autism is, the therapies designed to assist in it, and helping families affected by it.

For many autistic individuals, April is Autism Acceptance Month. It highlighted by the color red, shared personal experiences, and quoting a lot from each other. It’s about posts of what autism is really like, programs for autistic adults, and what the future holds for them.

These two shouldn’t be so different, but they are.

With SPARC, I find myself a bit in the middle. I have grown understandably wary of Autism Speaks since speaking to and listening to autistic individuals, and I definitely feel that not enough focus has been made on involving autistics in the autism conversation (at least not here in the United States). At the same time, I don’t think we’ve gotten past the awareness stage yet, either. There are still huge pockets of communities that don’t know everything they could know about autism. Awareness just has to be done correctly, and with respect rather than ignorance.

I think both need to be focused on, without being at odds with one another.

So…maybe we should Light It Up Purple…

“Broken Normals”

This debate that is summed up in the video below is pretty much the epicenter of the autism world: “cure/treat” versus acceptance.

It is what separates the different therapeutic approaches, the location and allotment of funding, and cultural response with regards to autism. Do we aim to “fix” autism, or do we aim to accept autism? While I personally come from the angle of acceptance, a sizable chunk of the autism therapeutic community thinks otherwise, and that is evident in where the money is going.

At some point as a society, we accepted other forms of neurodiversity and assimilated them into the flock. Even though discrimination is still present, and laws to protect are still needed, we overall moved past the need to completely erase certain conditions. It took a LOT of work, though, and the fight continues today. I wonder when we will get to that point with autism, and how much education and acceptance it will take.

I may do a much longer post on this subject later, or maybe even a series. Heaven knows the subject deserves it. For now, this is a brief look into it.

VICE News: “Broken Normals”