Being Led

I’m sad that I can’t watch this entire documentary (it’s for UK audiences only), but those in the UK can watch it for I believe another two days on BBC One. People are saying good things about it. This segment is a very refreshing look at the father/son dynamic with regards to autism. It is on BBC Stories’ Facebook page.

 

Also, programming note: There’s a lot going on in my world for the next month or so. While I’m determined to commit to keeping up with about a post a week, I may miss one here or there. Once things get settled in June, expect an uptick in activity.

Article: “None of you are going to college.”

No, not exactly an autism piece, but this does give a hard look at the reality of being black and in special education here in the United States. This has to change, not just on the end of the institutions, but also on the end of the African-American community and its understanding/acceptance of neurodiversity. For both ends, education is critical.

His Teacher Told Him He Wouldn’t Go To College

Autism @ Work Reception: Thoughts

This past Wednesday, I was able to attend the evening reception for SAP’s Autism at Work conference. It featured a Q&A panel with three known authors in the autism world: Steve Silberman, John Elder Robison, and Dr. Stephen Shore. Robison and Shore are both autistic.

I quickly became aware that this reception (and indeed the conference itself) was attended by both neurotypical and neurodiverse individuals. It was my first time attending such an event, which was a bit bittersweet; this should be the norm for such conferences. There were even color codes on the name tags, letting everyone know each person’s level of comfort with being approached. Silberman later explained that while this was common for the autism conferences/talks he attended overseas, it was the first time he had seen the practice here in the United States. This further let me know how far behind my country is with regards to autism awareness and acceptance.

It again became clear when I asked the panel about their experiences with regards to how black and brown communities approach autism. Silberman woefully admitted that he wished he could have included more people of color in his book NeuroTribes, and Robison stated that the racial divide in autism is yet another symptom of the racial divide in medicine and education overall. Silberman shared a quick story of how he spoke with a black man who, when Silberman mentioned that he wrote a book about autism, basically replied, “Oh, that’s the white people disorder.” To say that the story saddened me is an understatement, but I am glad that I mustered the courage to ask about the topic. It led to several great conversations with other attendees afterwards.

This is one of the aspects of autism acceptance that hasn’t been achieved yet. There is a general awareness of it for the most part in minority communities, but it is still not understood enough in those communities to warrant full awareness. I know people who still put autism in the same category as MR, or like the man in the example, do not think it affects their community at all. A Mexican mother whose autistic son is a client of mine is very nervous about having him attend regular classes once he starts school. She would rather have him in special education classes than to face the bullying that she feels he would suffer through in mainstream classes. It broke my heart to hear that, especially since I feel her son has the potential to be able to thrive in regular classes of interest.

I want to end on a positive note, though, so here it is: The entire two day conference is a strong indicator of a shift in the business world. Companies are starting to realize the potential autistic employees have and how having neurodiverse people on their teams will help their companies grow and thrive. They recognize that hiring practices and procedures need to change and adjust; do talented individuals really need to go through a face-to-face interview? Do HR departments know how to bring in more neurodiverse applicants (right now, the answer appears to be “no”)? The questions and situations are starting to be explored and asked, which is a great step forward. Institutions are starting the slow process of change.

Here are a couple of pictures from the reception, including the books I got signed:

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Ideas Everywhere!

I am going to detour from autism for just a post, because this directly relates to the programs I’m forming.

The concept of idea overload is a pretty common situation with writers. I have certainly had it in the past. You think up a story idea, you start on it, and then another story idea shoots off from that one, so you start tinkering with that new idea…and nothing ever gets finished. I seriously never thought I would have too many possible paths with regards to a business, but here I am.

There are, right now, about four possible paths I can take with SPARC. Only two of them are on this site right now. All still center around autism, but vary in approach. They each involve a different type of business plan, a slightly different network of people, slightly different goals (though the main theme is still autism acceptance), and involve different strengths of mine. I’ve been quietly testing each of them on a micro level, and all look equally promising. All of them also have interested/intrigued parties and potential partners.

This is the point where most people freeze.

A lot of us, when faced with several options, have a really hard time making a choice. This goes double if the wrong choice could (potentially) lead to a waste of resources. Even after doing market research and scouting for similar programs, it can still be difficult. I love all the programs equally, but tackling all of them at once is simply not possible this early in the game. One has to be put ahead of the others.

This is the main reason why I’ve been a bit quiet on the business side lately. I am building my network, but I am also monitoring the probability of success for each program. I have a few more emails and contacts to make, but I’m pretty sure that I will have a clear choice before the end of the April.

Ah, the joys of entrepreneurship!

Have any of you ever had a similar situation (too many potentially good ideas, not enough resources yet to execute them all)? How did you make your choices?

 

An Autism Wish List

I’m traveling/on vacation right now, but I wanted to share an amazing post with everyone about Autism Acceptance Day. The author, who is an autistic woman, made a wish list of what she hopes to see for autistic individuals in the future. Number four particularly resonated with me, as I know that I am still working on this due to being a product of my environment when it comes to autism services. The goal of “normal” is still very much the norm, so to speak, and I would like to help change that, starting with myself. I am still a work in progress. I may do an post just on this subject in the future.

Enjoy!

https://anonymouslyautistic.net/2017/04/02/autism-acceptance-day-wish-list/

The Bridge: Siblings

In working with child and teen clients, I have seen other professionals address the subject of siblings in one of two ways: inclusion or exclusion.

Thankfully, most of the time there is some degree of inclusion. Siblings are an intricate part of the everyday life of a child, and when the child is on the spectrum, brothers and sisters can take on a much more important role.

In most of my experiences (but not all), the siblings have been neurotypical. They are having a host of emotions regarding their autistic brother or sister: they are at times protective, sometimes jealous (because of the attention their sibling gets), often a bit confused as to how they can help, but almost always coming from a place of love.

For workers and professionals, they can present a challenge. The siblings often want to be involved in some way, particularly if the therapy is a play-based approach like I tend to use. They see the “cool” things I’m doing with their sibling, and naturally they want to be a part of it. Completely cutting the sibling out of the play (or worse, telling them that I’m only there for the client) can have negative results; the sibling may start acting out or “sabotaging” the session. Of course, if they have too much freedom, they could undercut whatever the worker is trying to do.

Here are some of the things I have done to incorporate the siblings into the sessions in a constructive way:

  • Sometimes, they just want to play with the “new” toys (if a worker brings toys) . With one family, I started giving the older brother his “own” toy/play station at the start of the session. This greatly minimized his tendency to snatch toys from my client.
  • Doing activities that all of the siblings (and ideally all of the family members) can participate in equally. Active games like ball games (kicking/rolling back and forth), art activities (fine motor skills treasure troves!), and board games (turn-taking, social interaction) are great ways to have fun, work on skills, and involve everyone.
  • Enlisting the siblings to help their autistic brothers and sisters. I honestly believe that kids want to be loved, accepted, and praised, and this is a great way to fold that in. I have seen parents do this really well, and in a variety of ways. The easiest way is having the sibling model some behavior or routine that they would like the autistic child or teen to pick up on. The praise they receive for their help does a lot to raise the self-esteem of both siblings.
  • Cooking can be a great activity, especially if any or all of the kids/teens show an interest in doing so. Interventionists have created some great cooking sessions where they have made everything from sandwiches to stews with the family. Make sure to use safety first!

I always try to talk to the siblings in some context, even if it is just a check-in while writing up my note or setting up. They often feel left out when their neurodiverse siblings have special friends coming in to work with just them. Looking at it from the neurotypical sibling’s viewpoint, I can see why they would feel isolated in that sense. I also make a point to commend the parents who have fine tuned the delicate art of giving all of the kids quality time, because it is by no means an easy feat. I encourage my fellow professionals to do the same. 🙂