Autism and Genetics

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For far longer than it should be needed, a vast majority of us in the autism community have said that genetics may account for a far bigger role in autism than any of the other factors being explored. Now, a study of over 2 million people in several countries is saying similar…to the tune of 80%.

This study not only included 2 million people, but covered a 16 year span. There have been many studies confirming the same findings, but none have been this huge. And while the study is not perfect (what study is?), it is leading researchers to a new field of exploration and questions regarding the role genetics play in autism, along with the role “environmental” factors may still play.

But how does one look for a history of autism in their family, especially if there are no concrete diagnosis to be found (which is often the case, particularly in minority families)?

The key lies in education; being familiar with the symptoms and listening to that instinct that something may not be adding up on the developmental milestones.

The key lies in communication: talking to the professionals (doctors, psychiatrists, etc.) and speaking up about your concerns.

It also lies in understanding: knowing what autism is, is not, and looking at it with empathy instead of sympathy.

The links to the study and an article about the study are below.

There is also a link to my first FREE autism class happening on August 3 in South Florida, which will give you a head start on all of those aforementioned keys.

Article on Study: Majority of autism risk resides in genes, multinational study suggests

A summary of the study itself in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (the full study has to be ordered through the Journal): Recurrence Risk of Autism in Siblings and Cousins: A Multinational, Population-Based Study

SPARC Guidance FREE “Hello, Autism” Class!

1st “Hello Autism” Class Info!

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We are excited and thrilled to announce that our first community class, “Hello, Autism” is set and ready! Here are the details:

Class: Hello Autism, the first class in SPARC’s community training series

Date: Saturday, August 3, 2019

Time: 2:30-4:30pm

Place: Mandel West Palm Beach Public Library at 411 Clematis Street, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (Hibiscus Room on the 3rd floor)

Cost: FREE!

RSVP: Email sparcguidance@gmail.com with your name, number of attendees, and zip code. You will also be added to a mailing list to get updates on this and other classes from SPARC, including parking/transportation information.

PLEASE NOTE: RSVP is required for this class, as there is VERY LIMITED seating for it. We can only take a maximum of 20 people for the class. Preference will be given to those in the 33407, 33404, and 33401 zip codes. Don’t worry, though; if enough people email us, we will definitely arrange another class in the near future. Those who attend this class will receive a discount for the second class in the series, which focuses on the school system and autism. Please visit the Classes page for more information about the various class series.

 

I love Sesame Street

ipanews_3586256d-6c91-4719-9c82-71774b49529f_1       John E. Barret/PA Images

I remember watching this show a lot as a child. Just to further date myself, I remember the Big Bird movie “Follow That Bird,” and I can faintly recall visiting Sesame Place in Texas before it closed.

So of course, seeing one of my favorite childhood shows stepping up for families and communities warms my heart. They have so many great resources and tools online for families of all types, including those touched by autism. Topics include autism (of course), community violence, financial education, and more! This website is a treasure chest of information, activities, and even professional development webinars. If you haven’t visited it yet, the link is below. The more resources, the better!

Sesame Street in Communities

Why SPARC Exists

These two recent stories, each with widely different results, illustrate very clearly why this company exists.

 

First, to train more people to respond like this:

Mother credits Universal Orlando employee for helping calm autistic child (click on the “see more” in  the mother’s Facebook entry for her entire story…it’s worth the read)

 

And second, to train more people to refrain from nonsense like this:

Teacher mocks autistic student with ‘most annoying’ award

 

Kudos to @UniversalORL for the actions of your obviously well-trained staff!

And to the Bailey Preparatory Academy and the Gary Community School Corporation…I’m available to offer autism trainings. 🙂

 

Spectrum: A Story of the Mind

I strongly encourage everyone to watch this video, because it is amazing. I agree with Dr. Grandin in this film; we should focus on the sensory input just as much, if not more, than the social skills when it comes to autism treatment. It’s about 23 minutes long, but so worth it. I may make this required viewing for my workshops in the future; I like it that much.

Also, the last adult interviewed in the film is Nick Walker, one of the first autistic adults that I had ever met. I actually had him look over my thesis proposal (which was about autism and multiple intelligence) some years ago. He was also the first person to make it clear to me that most adults like himself refer to themselves as autistic, not “a person on the spectrum.” I was pleasantly surprised to see him in this, and yes, he is very good at Aikido!

If the embedded video does not appear (it was acting funny while I was writing the post), then the direct link is also below.

Spectrum: A Story of the Mind

“Hello, I’m sitting here…”

I had a very surreal experience months ago that made me realize that any of us who do not fit the mold of “typical American” can expect to be ignored at some point, even when we are physically right there. This is also the reality of many on the autism spectrum.

I won’t go into massive detail about the situation, because it involved people that I care about that I think simply did not realize how tone deaf the conversation was sounding to me. I also didn’t bother to correct them because it would have quickly dampened a light and fluffy mood.

In hindsight, I should have said more.

The topic started on Black Panther, and then took a turn to different aspects of African-American culture (specifically with regards to us black women) that may have inspired other subcultures. I then watched and listened as two definitely not black people debated on who knew more about black culture in order to prove their side of the argument. I heard everything from “I lived in so-and-so, so I know more about it” to “I have a lot more black friends, so I know more about it.” Meanwhile, I sat and sipped my drink in silence, looking at both of them with what I can only describe as disappointed amusement.

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Finally, a third person hinted that maybe they should ask the one black person at the table. By then, I didn’t care to prove a point at all. The bartender came up, and that thankfully more or less ended the discussion.

So here’s the tricky part about this whole experience. I don’t want to necessarily be seen as the spokesperson for an entire race, but by being the only member of that race in the group, it was almost unavoidable. Therefore, I was taken aback when two of them started a “who knows black folks better” match in front of me. No matter what the initial subject, it would still come across as ridiculous in my eyes. I stayed silent because there was no way that I was going to purposefully support either point.

This later made me think about my spectrum clients, who were mostly kids. I have seen many people talk over them and discuss them (usually in a negative tone) without so much as a sideways glance their way. Interestingly enough, I have also heard many parents and teachers tell me that they know that the client understands what they are hearing, they are just not responding (at least, not verbally). It’s one of the reasons why I try very hard not to discuss them when they are sitting right there, at least not in a negative sense. If they are there, I praise their efforts or perhaps playfully acknowledge their moments of impish behavior (that often gets a knowing smirk from them). I also try to include them as much as possible in the conversation, because that is just basic manners, I think.

No, being black in America and being autistic in America are not the same thing. There is a lesson in my strange experience at the bar that can apply to practitioners in the autism field, though: if you’re talking about the person’s experience in their presence, you should at least acknowledge or include the person in the conversation.

Data Puzzles

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There is a lot of emphasis on data in the autism field, especially since Applied Behavior Analysis has a monopoly on the field right now (unfortunately). Everything is data driven, meaning that numbers must support everything. Success is measured in data. Research is (of course) measured by data. Intervention techniques soar or crash based on data.

So what happens when the data confuses people?

A recent study on autism prevalence in 4 year-olds is doing just that, because some of the data doesn’t make sense. For example, if the number of diagnosed kiddos below age 3 decreased in New Jersey, then why is the prevalence number increasing? One possibility is that the number of professionals trained to diagnose and treat autism is low and not increasing with the demand. Having been in three different metropolitan areas in the last 3 years (Bay Area, LA, and Palm Beach County), I can attest to this suggestion. There aren’t enough of us.

The link to an article about the study is below. New Jersey was one of the states examined because it appears to have the highest prevalence in the country right now, but also has a huge array of resources. They also said that because of this, NJ probably has the most accurate information in the study.

New autism prevalence stats spotlight challenge of early diagnosis