The Logo

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At first glance, the logo for SPARC seems pretty basic.

If you have followed the blog for awhile, though, you may have already discovered the “hidden message” inside of the logo, especially its “spark.” The colors chosen were not an accident. I believe I briefly went over them in a previous post, but I wanted to review the color choice in more detail.

The color blue stands for autism awareness, and it is usually seen as the “official” color for the movement. It comes with a bit of weight, however, as many autistic individuals find the color/movement to be dismissive of entire sections of individuals and not fully representative of the autism community. There is also seems to be a disconnection between the autism workers (who overwhelmingly support this color movement) and the autistic community.

This leads us to the color red, which was adopted by members of the autistic community to represent autism acceptance. This is a little different than its blue “companion.” The autism acceptance movement features an idea of “not us without us,” the valid premise that change and acceptance has to involve and include the very population it is supposed to help. This color/movement also seeks to include the factions of the autistic community who may have been ignored or unintentionally excluded from the “blue movement.”

Finally, we have SPARC’s color of purple.  Purple, of course, is created when blue and red are mixed together. I wanted SPARC to take the positive aspects of both movements, and honor them as one. We can push for both autism awareness and autism acceptance, so long as it is done in a manner than includes the very voices we neurotypicals claim to support, and promotes a healthy expansion of knowledge and resources. The two movements do not have to be at odds with each other, nor do they need to belittle one another. I hope for SPARC to grow into an example that honors the best of both movements, and recognize that both are needed to fulfill the third and fourth A’s of autism…Affirmation and Advocacy.

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