The Bridge: About Behaviors

This is a topic of interest for me, so much so that I created a training for professionals on dealing with “difficult” behaviors in clients. When it comes to autism, difficult usually refers to behaviors that are inconvenient, unnerving or harmful, or possibly embarrassing.  They range from persistent flapping to self-harm, and cover all points in between. The bottom line with all of them, however, is usually the same with families and adults who work closely with the clients: they would like the behaviors to reduce or stop.

In the training, I challenge my colleagues to become detectives first, and to view the behaviors from the eyes of our client. So, let’s take a new client, Paige. She is 14 years old, and nonverbal. She does not yet use any devices to communicate, aside from occasional pictures similar to PECS.

Paige often takes off running for no apparent reason. Sometimes it is just into another room, but sometimes it leads to her running towards traffic or out of the family home. Her family have no idea how to stop it and are deeply concerned for her safety. There are two things that need to be addressed almost simultaneously: Paige’s safety and the reasons behind her running.

A safety plan may be set up immediately, and nothing punishing is involved in it. Doors are kept secure, and someone stays with her regularly until the next step is engaged. At the same time, we start walking through a loose version of ABC (Antecedent, Behavior, Consequence) Data collection. This is one of the aspects of ABA that I actually like, because it brings in the detective aspect. We start examining all the events immediately leading up to the bursts of running, and I document them. After a few minutes, a pattern is noted. She tends to run when a large number of people enter the room she is in (about 3 or more). This is especially true if she is given no warning (for example, if neighbors or family members unexpectedly drop by). If Paige did have a device to communicate (or was verbal), I would more than likely get her input as well.

The family and I develop a plan to let Paige know when to expect an influx of people. We also let her know that if she gets overwhelmed, she can squeeze a trusted adult’s hand to let them know that she needs a break. Her receptive language has proven to be high, so we all believe that she definitely understands. This gives her some autonomy to tell us when she is feeling out of sorts, rather than us just assuming. After a few test runs, Paige is able to squeeze to alert her family. Within about three weeks, her running has reduced by over 50%.

For many behaviors like this, there is an underlying reason that we may be missing. It is usually something that a neurotypical individual would never guess, because it is not something that normally bothers us. This is why I like to reiterate how many neurodiverse brains tend to filter very differently from our own. This sets up a better sense of understanding from families and caregivers, and allows them to become better detectives and listen to their neurodiverse loved ones’ cues, whether they are verbal or not.

Next week: The behavior discussion continues with a look at the actions that aren’t harmful, but still baffle many of us. Have a great week, and feel free to email me with any questions/comments at sparcguidance@gmail.com.

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