The Bridge: The Approach

So I decided to title the series The Bridge, since that is essentially what you’re doing in this line of work. I hope that the series helps not only workers (whether a Specialist, Interventionist, Counselor, etc.) who are anxious about entering into this field, but also autistic people who may wonder why the heck we do what we do sometimes.

The first session is always the scariest one. Here’s the truth: no matter how experienced or confident you are, you’re going to be nervous. It’s a brand new client, and a brand new family. You (hopefully) know that you cannot approach this client exactly the same way you approach others, because you know that if you’ve met one autistic person…you’ve met one autistic person.

So what is the first thing you do? Jump straight into what they’re doing? Parallel play nearby? Redirect them to an activity of your choosing?

Me? I observe.

I usually tell the family that the first session is the introduction session and that I’m taking mental notes. In my silence, I start to answer several questions and make observations. Let’s use a kiddo I will call Peter as an example. Peter will be a composite of several different clients I’ve had in the past. He will also be a younger client since many of you that the series is intended for probably work in early intervention. I will rotate my example clients throughout the series.

So when I walk into Peter’s room, the little tyke is paying me little to no attention. He is walking around, humming to himself, and then briefly makes eye contact. I make a mental note of about how long the eye contact was (maybe one second) and will keep an eye on how many times he does it. He then retreats into a corner of the room, on the other side of the bed. So he has some kind of coping skill; he knows when to remove himself from a situation if he feels anxious or unsafe. I don’t follow him over.

While he is there, I ask his parents for some information: preferred toys, daily routine (I take another mental note if there is a lack of one), gross motor activities (does he do a lot of jumping, running, spinning?), family participation (do siblings engage or not, and what is his usual response?). Is Peter overly cautious, or does he throw fear to the wind?

I’m not writing any of this down, but I am starting to build a Peter profile of sorts in my head. All of us do this to some degree with people in our lives, and I assume that Peter is doing something similar with me. These first impressions set the stage for the entire process, so I don’t want to cause him any unnecessary fear or anxiety. The biggest thing I try to avoid is pushing myself into his safe zone too much. For session one, I just want him to know that I am there, I will be coming back, and that I want to play. I tell him this at the start and the end of the session; just because he’s not looking at me, doesn’t mean he’s not listening.

Goal of session one: Recon

For session two, I plan to come baring items of interest.

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